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Zaphod
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Message 23314 - Posted 13 Dec 2005 1:29:18 UTC

    I have three computers running, will be adding a fourth. Have access to some old machines and may add 1-10 more machine as funds become available.

    I build systems but know nothing about networking. Can I simply daisy-chain routers? Don't think I need a server because the only thing shared is the gateway. Could I use a high-speed wireless gaming router for several computers?

    what to do...
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    Profile Pooh Bear 27
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    Message 23316 - Posted 13 Dec 2005 1:54:05 UTC

      There are some cheap switches out there that will allow you to do this. Your router should give you approximately 250 addresses. I am currently running 8 computer at home off a single router and a couple of switches.

      Switches range in 4 port to 48 ports. The ones that are 12 and above are usually more expensive. There are some cheap 8 port ones out there, or depending on where you are putting your machines, get a few 4/5 port ones and set them all over the house, and make some even distributed heating.


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      Cupojoe
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      Message 23539 - Posted 16 Dec 2005 4:24:23 UTC - in response to Message 23314.

        Last modified: 16 Dec 2005 4:28:55 UTC

        Can I simply daisy-chain routers? Don't think I need a server because the only thing shared is the gateway. Could I use a high-speed wireless gaming router for several computers?

        what to do...


        You can certainly daisy-chain switches or hubs with no problem in a network of the size you're describing (note that some switches require the use of an Ethernet crossover cable when connecting to other switches, although most "consumer" level switches have at least one "uplink" port for this purpose). Daisy-chaining routers, however, is an entirely different matter. Even if your routers have the requisite quantity and type of interfaces, connecting them in series will pose a TCP/IP and routing protocol configuration challenge. For example, the link between each router requires a separate IP subnet, and any Ethernet interface on the router would require yet another separate IP subnet. Needless to say, this topology could get messy fast.

        The simplest, most cost-effective thing you could do would be to buy a switch with enough ports to cover all your computers, hook that up to your ISP router, and pop wired Ethernet adapters in any computers without them (D-Link makes an excellent NIC with drivers that work well with many operating systems for about ten bucks). I notice that you have three computers running Einstein, so it looks like you already have the DHCP vs. manual TCP/IP host configuration issue figured out.
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        This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grants PHY-1104902, PHY-1104617 and PHY-1105572 and by the Max Planck Gesellschaft (MPG). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the investigators and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF or the MPG.

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