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Profile Grant Hoernke
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Message 76116 - Posted 18 Oct 2007 11:05:09 UTC

    Is there any way possible to allow anti-aliasing in the screensaver for computers with higher-end graphics cards? I realize this is a trivial question, but I still need to ask ;)
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    Message 78572 - Posted 22 Dec 2007 16:16:11 UTC

      Since graphics of computer games are advancing maybe now it is time for calculating software screen savers need to advance from DOS type of graphics. For example in seti and rosetta ss they show certain graphical details of calculation but really lacks picture views of basic thing but in einstein there is no any calculation graphing.
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      Message 78575 - Posted 22 Dec 2007 18:11:39 UTC - in response to Message 78572.

        Since graphics of computer games are advancing maybe now it is time for calculating software screen savers need to advance from DOS type of graphics.

        It's hardly DOS that's used to show the graphics, but OpenGL. Only the Seti application (for Windows) will switch back to DirectX 3D graphics if you lack sufficient system and graphics memory.

        By itself it uses a lot of CPU cycles already at this moment. Any additional options will only make that worse as the data still has to be moved from main memory to the graphics card memory. If you want to add options as anti-aliasing or bump-mapping, you can usually do so through the options menu of your video card.

        For example in seti and rosetta ss they show certain graphical details of calculation but really lacks picture views of basic thing but in einstein there is no any calculation graphing.

        The function of a screen saver is to have as little static positioned parts on screen as possible, to prevent them from burning in. The Seti screen saver has a nice big logo that's completely at standstill, burning in if you allow it enough time.

        That the Einstein screen saver shows no calculations is probably because it doesn't do any. It doesn't calculate the best amino acid with the least energy signature or that one elusive radio signal that says we're not alone.
        It searches for spinning neutron stars. How do you want that shown as calculations? The code scrolling down the screen? Just asking.
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        Message 78594 - Posted 23 Dec 2007 0:01:14 UTC

          Last modified: 23 Dec 2007 0:02:41 UTC

          I also think that the screensaver should be improved, tho I understand this can't be a high priority task at the moment. While doing the search for pulsars emitting GWs, the science app maintains a list of the 10,000 most interesting points in the "parameter space" that particular workunit is looking at. It would be somewhat more exciting to look at if those "candidates" or a subset of those were somehow visualized. I've played around with visualizing these results recently, see this discussion & examples.

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          Message 78599 - Posted 23 Dec 2007 4:36:38 UTC

            Last modified: 23 Dec 2007 4:38:58 UTC

            Remember in reality more people care graphical illusion than neutron star things if the project offer maybe periodical cool ss's then more people want to enjoy "colorful" and fancy stuff while project itself would benefit far more computing power than today.
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            Message 78601 - Posted 23 Dec 2007 8:08:30 UTC - in response to Message 78594.

              I also think that the screensaver should be improved, tho I understand this can't be a high priority task at the moment. While doing the search for pulsars emitting GWs, the science app maintains a list of the 10,000 most interesting points in the "parameter space" that particular workunit is looking at. It would be somewhat more exciting to look at if those "candidates" or a subset of those were somehow visualized. I've played around with visualizing these results recently


              Well, you've seen that there are software injections. I think there can also be hardware injections. SETI's injections would probably not stick around on the screen for very long, but I'll admit that I don't know for sure. I would guess though that an injection here, if the screensaver was modified to be similar to what you're doing in the other thread, would hang around for a while. You could drive up questions regarding what this HUGE GLARING SIGNAL means, which you'd then have to educate the masses on how to detect an injection, which could then lead to perhaps people learning how to check for a result that is clearly a "test result" and aborting it if found.

              Frankly, I'd just model a new screensaver based on the general principles of the LHC screensaver. All it does is have some particles rotating around in eliptical patterns. They really do not have anything to do with the current result being worked on. Look at it here

              Also, in regards to screen burn-in, modern CRTs have better coatings of the phosphors, so modern CRTs are considerably less likely to get a burned-in image, although it can happen. If one is using an LCD, there is no phosphor involved, so there is nothing to "save", as it were...
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              Message 79187 - Posted 9 Jan 2008 21:14:45 UTC

                Still, you can get "image permanence" on LCD screens; I don't know exactly how it happens but it's a possibility.

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                Message 79426 - Posted 15 Jan 2008 19:21:11 UTC - in response to Message 79187.

                  Still, you can get "image permanence" on LCD screens; I don't know exactly how it happens but it's a possibility.

                  As the LCD gets used the pixels "wear". If they wear unevenly then you get permanent images in the screen. However it normally takes much longer than the best CRT for this to happen.

                  A LCD artifact that I find interesting is temporary permanent images. I have been able to see "burned in" images but if you display something different for awhile the image goes away.
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                  Message 96882 - Posted 10 May 2009 5:56:12 UTC

                    Just a simple request. Since all constellations are delineated in the graphics, how about highlighting Polaris as a point of reference so that if you zoom into the sphere you have some way to orient yourself?

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                    Message 98223 - Posted 21 Jul 2009 14:50:22 UTC

                      I've never liked the screensaver myself as someone who knows nothing about the science but believes strongly in helping out.

                      Personally I'd like to see a more 'educational' approach that starts with a simple view that can maybe be expanded for the more advanced users.

                      I hate the 'outside looking in' view probly the most,to me it just looks like a ball with a bunch of dots,id love to be able to see it from 'earths' point of view & be able to see all the constellations(or just the ones near whatever workunit your doing at the time?) as seen from earth with the names of each constellation to educate,ya sure maybe I can recognize a couple but I'd like to know all of them in relation to my work unit & its place in the night sky. maybe I'm wrong?,but I've always thought with this way you could literally look at the screensaver & depending on your workunit know exactly where to look in the night sky(more or less) & say :wow! my computer is searching that part of the sky right now!.

                      At least people like myself who might be interested in what's out their but not educated more then the little they learned about the night sky in grade school could really benefit.

                      Thanks.

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                      Message 98232 - Posted 21 Jul 2009 20:52:23 UTC - in response to Message 98223.

                        I've never liked the screensaver myself as someone who knows nothing about the science but believes strongly in helping out.

                        Personally I'd like to see a more 'educational' approach that starts with a simple view that can maybe be expanded for the more advanced users.

                        I hate the 'outside looking in' view probly the most,to me it just looks like a ball with a bunch of dots,id love to be able to see it from 'earths' point of view & be able to see all the constellations(or just the ones near whatever workunit your doing at the time?) as seen from earth with the names of each constellation to educate,ya sure maybe I can recognize a couple but I'd like to know all of them in relation to my work unit & its place in the night sky. maybe I'm wrong?,but I've always thought with this way you could literally look at the screensaver & depending on your workunit know exactly where to look in the night sky(more or less) & say :wow! my computer is searching that part of the sky right now!.

                        At least people like myself who might be interested in what's out their but not educated more then the little they learned about the night sky in grade school could really benefit.

                        Thanks.


                        If you open the graphics from Boinc and the hold your right mouse button down while moving the mouse you can zoom your view.

                        Hope this helps
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                        Tobescu Robert Ionut
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                        Message 105506 - Posted 14 Aug 2010 16:27:05 UTC

                          Hi there, i'm new here, but i was just wondering couldn't you as some tooltips for the screensaver constelations it would make it a bit more intresting.

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                          This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grants PHY-1104902, PHY-1104617 and PHY-1105572 and by the Max Planck Gesellschaft (MPG). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the investigators and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF or the MPG.

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