Einstein@Home discovers a new radio pulsar in Arecibo data

log in

Advanced search

Message boards : News : Einstein@Home discovers a new radio pulsar in Arecibo data

Author Message
Profile Bruce Allen
Volunteer moderator
Project administrator
Project developer
Project scientist
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 15 Oct 04
Posts: 1105
Credit: 171,768,817
RAC: 0
Message 114698 - Posted: 27 Oct 2011, 21:21:25 UTC

I am delighted to announce that Einstein@Home has discovered a third new radio pulsar in data from the Arecibo Observatory. This is the first Einstein@Home discovery in Arecibo data taken with the new "Mock" back-end spectrometer. The pulsar is unusually interesting, as is a short-period (millisecond) pulsar in a binary system. Further details about the newly-discovered pulsar can be found on this web page, and will be published in due course.

Congratulations to our volunteers, and thank you for contributing to Einstein@Home!

Bruce Allen
Director, Einstein@Home
____________

Profile Mike Hewson
Volunteer moderator
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 5077
Credit: 41,726,060
RAC: 9,479
Message 114699 - Posted: 27 Oct 2011, 21:41:32 UTC

Neat! Our first Mock, and another rare bird too ! :-)

Cheers, Mike.
____________
"I have made this letter longer than usual, because I lack the time to make it short." - Blaise Pascal

Profile Bruce Allen
Volunteer moderator
Project administrator
Project developer
Project scientist
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 15 Oct 04
Posts: 1105
Credit: 171,768,817
RAC: 0
Message 114704 - Posted: 28 Oct 2011, 10:03:46 UTC - in response to Message 114699.

Neat! Our first Mock, and another rare bird too ! :-)


Yes, it's very satisfying!
____________
Profile Rechenkuenstler
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 22 Aug 10
Posts: 136
Credit: 78,796,625
RAC: 8,349
Message 114705 - Posted: 28 Oct 2011, 12:28:02 UTC - in response to Message 114704.

Then let's go ahead to discover the first gamma ray pulsar.

Congratulations to all. That's a big motivation
____________

Mexonius
Send message
Joined: 10 Oct 11
Posts: 1
Credit: 15,118
RAC: 0
Message 114706 - Posted: 28 Oct 2011, 13:37:28 UTC

yep, very confortable for all of us! this is what is said "good teamwork" :P
I think we can all be proud of our commitment to science :P

Thx you too Mr Bruce!

Profile AMONRA
Send message
Joined: 11 Sep 10
Posts: 4
Credit: 1,046,629
RAC: 36
Message 114709 - Posted: 28 Oct 2011, 17:28:28 UTC - in response to Message 114705.



Then let's go ahead to discover the first gamma ray pulsar.


Let's hope it happens soon!
Profile MAGIC Quantum Mechanic
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 18 Jan 05
Posts: 1057
Credit: 273,020,481
RAC: 253,985
Message 114711 - Posted: 28 Oct 2011, 23:00:29 UTC


Thanks for the info Bruce.


____________

TeamStreetLegal
Send message
Joined: 26 Jul 09
Posts: 1
Credit: 70,703
RAC: 0
Message 114712 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 4:42:25 UTC

Hi there, just one little question:

When looking at the graphics of the Einstein@home Workunit for the Binary Radio Pulsar Search (Arecibo) v1.00 (BRP3SSE), especially the Arecibo Power Spectrum at the top right corner and i am seeing the first 2 to 3 bars on the left highlighted white with a higher Peak than the other bars aside -> would this fall into the category "possible Candidate" or "something else" (maybe something "already known")?

The Workunit i am talking about had the Task ID: "254159161" (Name: "p2030.20091122.G69.24+00.28.N.b4s0g0.00000_224_0") and Work unit ID: "108164397" (Name: "p2030.20091122.G69.24+00.28.N.b4s0g0.00000_224").

Didn't see it in the list of the already know Pulsars, so that's how my question came up, when i was thinking about if this could be a sign (or if this is a typical sign) of something special or just something regular/already known.

Robert,
from Germany

Profile Benjamin
Project developer
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 1 Jun 06
Posts: 111
Credit: 4,973,892
RAC: 1
Message 114713 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 8:11:10 UTC - in response to Message 114712.

Hi Robert,

we'll see. It could be a pulsar at low frequencies, so one that's spinning rather not very fast. It's also possible that this is so-called radio frequency interference ("RFI" for short). RFI are any man-made radio signals that also show up in astronomical observations of radio telescopes. This can be radar stations, GPS satellites, cell phones, sparking plugs in car engines, etc., etc.

These RFI signals happen at the Earth so they are not dispersed, i.e. unlike celestial signals they don't have to travel trough the interstellar medium. This is reflected in the fact that the RFI usually is strongest at low dispersion measure (an indirect measure of the astronomical distance). The dispersion measure is encoded in the workunit name, it's given by the numbers after the last "_", here the number "224" means that the dispersion measure is 22.4 pc/cm^3, which would correspond to an astronomical source rather close to Earth.

In short: if this is a new pulsar, you'll find it showing up on the discovery page at some point, because this certainly should show up in our post-processing.

Thanks for the watchful eye!


Cheers,
Benjamin
____________

KWSN-GMC-Peeper of the Castle Anthrax
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 6 Oct 05
Posts: 63
Credit: 41,145,413
RAC: 53,364
Message 114714 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 14:35:19 UTC - in response to Message 114705.
Last modified: 29 Oct 2011, 14:41:36 UTC

I've been doing this all so long I don't actually keep up on a day to day..or even year to year basis anymore.
Do we actually have capability to detect gamma ray 'signals'?
____________

Profile Benjamin
Project developer
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 1 Jun 06
Posts: 111
Credit: 4,973,892
RAC: 1
Message 114715 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 15:17:37 UTC - in response to Message 114714.
Last modified: 30 Oct 2011, 21:41:49 UTC

Hi,

since July 2011 Einstein@Home has also been analyzing data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard NASA's Fermi satellite, which detects gamma rays. The satellite has already found gamma ray pulsars in these data (not with Einstein@Home). You can find more details on the Einstein@Home search in this thread: http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/forum_thread.php?id=8948.


Cheers,
Benjamin
____________

KWSN-GMC-Peeper of the Castle Anthrax
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 6 Oct 05
Posts: 63
Credit: 41,145,413
RAC: 53,364
Message 114716 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 15:28:54 UTC - in response to Message 114715.

thanks for responding. and so promptly.

____________

Profile Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
Volunteer moderator
Project administrator
Project developer
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 28 Aug 06
Posts: 3502
Credit: 149,167,494
RAC: 121,069
Message 114719 - Posted: 29 Oct 2011, 20:36:13 UTC

Congratulations to the volunteers and scientists involved!

As for the spectrum display in the screen saver/ graphics app: because of an optimization in the CUDA code, this is not very accurate (in short, signals that are too weak to have a chance to make it into the final top-list of signals that is reported back to the server are written back to main memory by the CUDA app. This is the reason why the spectrum display is usually rather unspectacular.

HBE
____________

Profile Wcheney
Send message
Joined: 13 Jul 06
Posts: 2
Credit: 1,189,619
RAC: 2,319
Message 114724 - Posted: 30 Oct 2011, 7:11:27 UTC

Really nice to know that all the work amounts to something Significant!!!
Congratulations to all!
Bill
____________

Profile hoarfrost
Send message
Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 193
Credit: 39,117,548
RAC: 746
Message 114790 - Posted: 4 Nov 2011, 20:28:00 UTC

On Einstein@Home Binary Radio Pulsar Search Progress Page, in Search progress on copied beams graphic gray and blue colors have a one sense - 0% processed beams. May be mark all unprocessed beams as blue?
____________

Profile Benjamin
Project developer
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 1 Jun 06
Posts: 111
Credit: 4,973,892
RAC: 1
Message 114798 - Posted: 5 Nov 2011, 18:39:47 UTC - in response to Message 114790.

Hi!

The beams in blue are processed by slightly more than 0%, maybe a few percent; but it's not so much that the color would change significantly to green or something else. Look at them in 24 hours and you'll see the progress. Processing of the grey beams has not started at all, that's the difference.

Cheers, Benjamin
____________

Profile hoarfrost
Send message
Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 193
Credit: 39,117,548
RAC: 746
Message 114800 - Posted: 5 Nov 2011, 19:44:30 UTC - in response to Message 114798.

Hi!

The beams in blue are processed by slightly more than 0%, maybe a few percent; but it's not so much that the color would change significantly to green or something else. Look at them in 24 hours and you'll see the progress. Processing of the grey beams has not started at all, that's the difference.

Cheers, Benjamin

Hi!

I know, that NULL is not equal to 0. :)
But if beams with not started processing will be painted in color of zero processed beams - it is would be clear and handsome.
____________
Profile Benjamin
Project developer
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 1 Jun 06
Posts: 111
Credit: 4,973,892
RAC: 1
Message 114801 - Posted: 5 Nov 2011, 21:12:37 UTC - in response to Message 114800.
Last modified: 5 Nov 2011, 22:41:34 UTC

But if beams with not started processing will be painted in color of zero processed beams - it is would be clear and handsome.


That's not what I would like to see in the plots. Doing it this way means losing the information that the processing of this beam has not started at all; this means that the data have been copied to the pre-processing maching at the AEI in Hannover, but that they have not yet been sent out to Einstein@Home volunteers. You're right that (judging by processing percentage) alone there's no difference between grey and blue, but that's not the whole picture. There is a difference between not started at all (=grey) and started processing with 0
Cheers, Benjamin
____________

Message boards : News : Einstein@Home discovers a new radio pulsar in Arecibo data


Home · Your account · Message boards

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grants PHY-1104902, PHY-1104617 and PHY-1105572 and by the Max Planck Gesellschaft (MPG). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the investigators and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF or the MPG.

Copyright © 2016 Bruce Allen